Colors and life everywhere! How beautiful it is, Cabilao! (Philippines, February 2019)
Colors and life everywhere! How beautiful, Cabilao! (Philippines, February 2019)

The beautiful surprises of Cabilao, a small coral jewel

#Philippines

Dear English-speaking readers, this page is an automatic Google translation from a post originally written in French. My apologies for the weird sentences and the funny mistakes that could have been generated during the process. If you can read French, the original and correct version can be found here:

  Philippines : Cabilao + Balicasag [Panglao-Bohol] - February-March 2019

Making bubbles along coral drop-offs brimming with life and colour, what a delight! In the Philippines, the island of Cabilao is a real little underwater jewel.

Cabilao, a quiet little island

I bring you back in February 2019, to the Philippines. For this stay, I have only two weeks ahead of me and I have decided to devote the first one to Cabilao, who has been catching my eye for quite a few years...

Cabilao is a tiny island of less than five square miles. Triangular in shape, it is located on the northwest coast of Bohol, in the Strait of Cebu. It is here:

Cabilao seen from the sky. It is the triangular island in the foreground. (Philippines, February 2019)
Cabilao seen from the sky. It is the triangular island in the foreground. (Philippines, February 2019)
The dive sites of Cabilao. (Philippines, February 2019)
The dive sites of Cabilao. (Philippines, February 2019)

Cabilao has five villages and less than 5,000 inhabitants, living mainly from fishing, farming and tourism. Unlike other islands near Bohol, it is not connected by a bridge, so the place has remained fairly quiet.

There is a peaceful atmosphere which contrasts with the tourist frenzy of Alona Beach on Panglao, not far from there, which scared me away during my very first stay in the Philippines in 2008

Apart from diving, there is not much to do on Cabilao... There is a large inland lake that can be walked around, lots of small roads where it is easy to ride a scooter, some tourist accommodations and a handful of diving resorts.

It's the perfect island to break from the hustle and bustle of the world... 👌

Above: one of the small roads of Cabilao, easy to ride on a scooter. At the small harbour of Talisai, on the south-east coast, you are welcomed by the Ten Commandments. (Philippines, February 2019)

Bangkas (or bancas), traditional Philippine boats with pendulums, act as a "ferry" between Bohol and Cabilao. (Philippines, February 2019)
The bangkas (or bancas), traditional Philippine boats with pendulums, act as "ferry" between Bohol and Cabilao Island. (Philippines, February 2019)
The passengers on the bangka-ferry have just disembarked. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The passengers of the bangka-ferry have just landed at Talisai, on the southeast coast of the island. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Under the gray sky, the lake and its mangrove have a somewhat melancholy appearance. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Under the gray sky, the lake and its mangrove have a somewhat melancholy appearance. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The pontoon on the lake is more than rocky ... (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The jetty on the lake is more than rocky... (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The lake is a popular walking destination. I strike a pose with a group of Filipino students who have come for a walk and admire the view. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The lake is a popular walking destination. I strike a pose with a group of Filipino students who have come for a walk and admire the view. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The small road at the back of the resort. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The small road at the back of the resort. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

Diving without too many divers around...

After browsing the internet and reading reviews on diving forums (I will often rummage on Plongeur.com and Scubaboard.com to prepare my stays), I opted for the Cabilao Sanctuary and its diving center Miscellaneous Cabilao (located right next to another resort which is often highly recommended too, the Polaris).

I am delighted to have chosen the first (and I have no shares with them).

I discover that the clientele is rather family oriented, so that there are few divers as keen as me (understand: linking three dives a day). So there are very few of us on the boat for diving exploration trips (most of the other clients do first dives or training) and therefore always in very small groups underwater... 👌

For a photographer diver like me (understand: who can't stand the big groups that scare the fish away), this is ideal. I admit, I took a malicious pleasure to observe, from far away, the groups that piled up every morning on the boats of the nearby resort.

Two very nice young French instructors manage the Cabilao Divers centre during my stay. They understand very well my expectations and I appreciate the way they organize the fun dives: choice of sites almost à la carte from day to day (depending on the conditions), small size groups and distributed by levels... And, regularly, I have one of the Filipino guides, knowing perfectly the reefs of Cabilao, for me alone. Absolute luxury in my eyes! 🤗

For the rest, everything else is fine too. There are rooms for all budgets, a nice little swimming pool for post-diving desalting, a nice terrace facing the sea to enjoy the sunset and the staff is adorable. A detail that doesn't spoil anything: as the management is French, the food served at the restaurant is very pleasant.

The two great Filipino guides who worked at the Cabilao Dive Center during my stay. (Philippines, February 2019)
The two great Filipino guides who worked at the Cabilao Dive Center during my stay. (Philippines, February 2019)
I have never managed to carry my camera myself to the boat ... There is always a helpful hand rushing to help me. (Philippines, Cabilao, February 2019)
I have never managed to carry my camera myself to the boat... There is always someone rushing to give me a hand. (Philippines, Cabilao, February 2019)
The terrace was being repainted during my stay. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The terrace was being repainted during my stay. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The resort faces west, the sunsets are sumptuous every evening. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The resort faces west, the sunsets are sumptuous every evening. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The pretty little pool, slightly elongated and distorted by the panoramic mode of the iPhone. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The pretty little pool, a little elongated and distorted in this photo by the panoramic mode of my iPhone. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

My “& #160; house & #160;” for the week, a simple bungalow & #8230; (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

In the evening, the hermit crabs are on the loose and the geckos have eyes bigger than their stomachs & #8230; (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

Coral in great shape

Frankly, I was expecting at least "nice" dives at Cabilao, but I quickly realize that we're a notch above...

From the first dive, at the aptly named Gorgonian Wall, I'm won over. 😲 There is something exhilarating and moving at the same time to look at such a beautiful underwater landscape. I could almost shed a tear in my mask...

The good health of the coral, exuberant, varied, dense, is so delightful to see!

Colors and life everywhere! How beautiful, Cabilao! (Philippines, February 2019)
Colors and life everywhere! How beautiful, Cabilao & #160 ;! (Philippines, February 2019)

For the wide-angle ambient photos, I have a lot of things to enjoy... I discover with amazement huge orange and pink gorgonians, big tables of Acropora, purple and yellow soft corals in profusion, spectacular barrel sponges... And at every dive or almost every dive, one or more turtles can be seen! Day after day, I am captivated by Cabilao's coral drop offs. In front of these vertical walls overflowing with life, the most delicate thing to manage is the sunlight for underwater photos, because it is not always positioned in the perfect place - depending on the orientation of the sites, the time of day, the direction of the current... Yes, I have big problems in life... 😂

Macro photo side, the small fauna usual in these latitudes presents here a rich diversity of species, whether you are a fan of nudibranchs (sea slugs), pygmy seahorses, frogfishes (Antennariids), delicate ghost pipefishes or hideous scorpion fishes... 😍 You can't get bored! Apart from the drop-offs, there are also a few more "muck-dive" oriented sites (where you can look for small fauna hiding in the substrate) on a sandy bottom, with seagrass beds and coral rubble.

I show you below a small selection of pictures, which give a good idea of what to expect when diving at Cabilao.

Backlight on a double barrel sponge bristling with protuberances. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Backlight on a double barrel sponge bristling with protuberances. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

Along the drop-offs, you can admire imposing gorgonians, roses, orange-yellow... (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

Gorgonians addict... (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

Drifting along the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Drifting along the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Huge tables of Acropora hard coral are staged along the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Huge tables of Acropora hard coral are staged along the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
This spectacular colony of Acropora has invaded all the space on this portion of the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
This spectacular colony of Acropora has invaded all the space on this portion of the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Atmosphere at the top of the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Atmosphere at the top of the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
An imposing bright orange gorgonian extends its ramifications in the current. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
An imposing bright orange gorgonian extends its ramifications in the current. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Tangle of corals on the top of the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Tangle of corals on the top of the reef. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Always very photogenic, harlequin syngnaths or ghost fish (ghost pipe-fish, in English), often go in pairs, upside down. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Always very photogenic, harlequin syngnaths or ghost fish (ghost pipe-fish, in English), often go in pairs, upside down. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The much sought after Coleman shrimp (Periclimenes colemani), a species named in honor of Australian naturalist Neville Coleman (1938-2012). They are found as a couple, living in symbiosis with the formidable fire urchin which protects them from its stinging stingers. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
The much sought after Coleman shrimp (Periclimenes colemani), a species named in honor of Australian naturalist Neville Coleman (1938-2012). They are found as a couple, living in symbiosis with the formidable fire urchin which protects them from its stinging stingers. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
A pipefish, also called sea needle or pipe-fish in English, hunting on the sandy substrate. It is a cousin of seahorses. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
A pipefish, also called a sea needle or pipe fish in English, hunting on the sandy substrate. It is a cousin of seahorses. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

A cute bargibanti pygmy seahorse, clinging to its gorgonian branch with purple polyps and a denise pygmy seahorse. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019) Read also → Shy as a pygmy seahorse

The golden apogon, mouth closed then open, revealing its eggs which it incubates in its mouth ... This is what is called oral incubation. (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

Above, close-up portrait of a scorpion fish, and a nudibranch (sea slug) which takes itself for a bull & #8230; (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

Too cute, this little scarlet frogfish (antennae). (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
Too cute, this little scarlet frogfish (antennae). (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
This giant frogfish is too big to fit under my macro lens ... (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
This giant frogfish is too large to fit under my macro lens & #8230; (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
An anemonefish monitors its eggs, which it regularly "aerates" with its fins. (Philippines, Cabilao, February 2018)
An anemonefish monitors its eggs, which it regularly “aires” #160 with its fins. (Philippines, Cabilao, February 2018)

As for hammerhead sharks who once swam in the waters of Cabilao (and which some dive tour operators still dare to sometimes mention or even photograph, to bait the client), no need to hope to see any. They were massively fished in 1999-2000 and their population has never recovered. Besides, I have not seen big fish around...

The Cabilao sites therefore have everything to please Zen and contemplative divers, rather oriented "bio" (biology), knowing how to appreciate the splendor of the coral and the profusion of small animals as strange as fascinating. But this is clearly not a corner for lovers of "big" (even if, as in Balicasag, not far from there, we are not immune to come across a good big whale shark passing by).

Marine protected areas

Good to know: you have to pay a small daily fee to be allowed to dive in Cabilao, because the island has two marine protected areas (MPAs). That's lucky for the coral and the local fishes. It's probably thanks to those MPAs that the reefs have remained so beautiful...

MPAs are indeed very effective in preserving or locally regenerating an underwater ecosystem, whether in Asia or the Mediterranean Sea. In addition, MPAs benefit the surrounding waters, helping them to repopulate and to enrich themselves in terms of species and biomass: this is the "reserve effect". A real boost for nature! Unfortunately, this is just a drop in the ocean, faced with these three very destructive practices: dynamite fishing, industrial fishing and shark finning...

In Asia in particular, dynamite fishing has destroyed many reefs in a few decades. Although now illegal and very dangerous, it is still practised in certain corners near the coral reefs. I have already happened several times, in Indonesia and the Philippines, in particular, to hear explosions underwater, during dives... Scary. The sound propagates underwater without you being able to identify its direction or distance.

On the high seas, these are the factory ships of industrial fishing, those of China at the head, which are the most devastating. They continue to literally empty the ocean, depleting the stocks of fish that cannot be replenished, not to mention their innumerable catches called "accessories" (dolphins, turtles, and other commercially exploitable species).

Finally, there is also the juicy shark-finning, that is to say shark fin fishing, intended for the Asian market, disastrous for populations of sharks, which are essential predators for the balance of marine ecosystems... An ocean without sharks is the terrestrial life that is threatened.

At my modest diving tourist scale, I had the chance to discover many protected sites, reserves and marine parks, offering beautifully preserved and lively reefs. In Cabilao therefore, as well as in Tubbataha and Balicasag in the Philippines, but also in Sipadan in Malaysia, at Komodo and Raja Ampat in Indonesia...

On divers' or travellers' newsgroups, I sometimes read comments from people who are outraged to be charged a fee to have access to some of these marine protected areas, in Asia or elsewhere – some even congratulating themselves on having managed to avoid paying it... Not something to brag about. Part of the money collected is used to involve local people in the conservation of their environment and fishery resources. But awareness and goodwill are not enough. Without financial means, it is impossible to protect a maritime area from poaching, building, overexploitation or pollution...

It wriggles on the reef ... (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)
It wriggles on the reef & #8230; (Cabilao, Philippines, February 2019)

My previous diving trips to the Philippines

After Cabilao, I chose to stay in the area and devote the second part of my stay to the dive sites accessible by the day from Panglao: in particular the island of Balicasag and the sumptuous reef of Doljo. I'll tell you about it in a future post...

This stay from February-March 2019 is already my fifth trip to Philippines. As I often write to those who ask me for route advice, it is impossible to discover the many facets of this immense archipelago and its countless dive sites at once... We have to make choices. To inspire you, here are my previous journeys:

  Philippines : Cabilao + Balicasag [Panglao-Bohol] - February-March 2019

  1. I came across your blog by doing research on diving in the Philippines where I had the opportunity to dive and I wanted to tell you that I really like the way you describe your experiences and the images that go with it. Your involvement in becoming aware of our environment is also to be welcomed. Continue to make us travel and dream.
    Terima Kasih

  2. Hello Corinne
    thank you again for this blog and this story, we were on Tubbataha last year and I was captivated by it and on Palawan (in road trip mode). I'm looking to do another trip to the Philippines and I think I know where to go now...
    Comme tu le dis il faut plusieurs séjours pour se faire une idée des Philippines, mais comme toi, nous fuyons les endroits touristiques. Je confirme , et oui il faut payer les parcs si l’on veut continuer à s’émerveiller dans ces endroits, on peut pas tout avoir, sans rien ni contrepartie surtout dans ces pays.

    1. Thank you Corinne, you have the art of finding dream destinations !! Where do we go to get to this paradise? And is it affordable?
      We return from the Banda Sea, cruise from Ambon to Kaimana a treat & #8230;
      Let's go back at the end of April with marine biologists from Sorong to Ternate & #8230; we discover these corners & #8230;
      Sincerely
      Yves

    2. @ marcopolo8356: Tubbataha is truly unique in the Philippines. But there is a way to have fun with sites that are easier to access and not too crowded with people, like Cabilao & #8230;
      🙂

    3. @Yves Guénot: Cabilao, oui, c’est très abordable et facile d’accès. C’est près des très touristiques îles de Bohol et Panglao, desservies par un aéroport désormais flambant neuf à Tagbilaran. Évidemment, c’est moins exceptionnel que la mer de Banda, mais les sites de Cabilao offrent de mon point de vue un triple rapport qualité des plongées / prix / tranquillité vraiment idéal pour un court séjour.

      Bon, tes itinéraires de croisière font pas mal rêver aussi… Ambon-Kaimana, Sorong-Ternate, on se refuse rien 😉 Ravie que tu découvres ces coins. Comme tu as pu déjà le constater, l’archipel indonésien mérite vraiment qu’on lui consacre du temps… J’y retourne sans me lasser, c’est un émerveillement à chaque fois. Je vais encore baver devant tes prochaines photos… 😀

    4. Hello Corinne
      Another great article that brings me back 6 years earlier to Cabilao
      I loved it!
      I remember the walk to the lake, the women selling their handicrafts, the friendliness of the locals and the superb dives
      Thank you for this time travel
      Happy New Year

  3. Hello Corinne. Thank you for these beautiful photos. I was in Cebu last winter but since it was an exclusively bubble-free diet, I did not take advantage of the surrounding reefs. Nice discovery in any case and thank you for sharing it with us.

    1. @ François: it's nice to meet you on the blog 🙂 Without bubbles, you mean freediving? Just verticality? If it is not to see coral or fish, it is a bit of a shame from my point of view as a photographer & #8230; I prefer to descend with my string of bubbles to enjoy the show & #8230; Delighted, in any case, to succeed in sharing my wonders through these images!

    1. @Feulvarch: you should enjoy! For my part I am delighted with my stay. Nickel diving center, great guides, a good atmosphere and a really nice little resort & #8230; Happy New Year too! 🙂

  4. I have been following you for a long time, in reading but also sometimes in traveling. I also practice photography but do not know anything about underwater photography even if I am a diver. But these photos of Cabilao are stunning. I'll be in the Philippines in a few days and tell myself that, yes, diving in Cabilao would be good for me!
    Thank you Corinne!

  5. Fan de tous vos articles qui font rêver. J’ai plongé sur les Visayas et Palawan et Cabilao me semble parfait pour ce que je cherche. Quelle est la meilleure période pour s’y rendre, car j’aimerais faire un petit tour vers Apo Island près de Siguiyor et un plongeur m’indique que pour la visibilité pour Apo est de Juin à Novembre ? Qu’n pensez-vous ?

    1. @Dominic: thank you very much 🙂

      In general, people whether they are divers or not prefer to avoid the monsoon and typhoon season in the Philippines, which roughly corresponds to the June-November period that you indicate & #8230; It is often recommended to travelers to prefer rather because of the weather the period which goes from December to May (December-January-February: period supposed to be dry and cooler; March-April-May: hot season).

      For visibility underwater precisely on the Apo Island side, I don't know if there is a time of year better than others. I had been to Siquijor and Dauin / Apo Island, etc. more than ten years ago, in 2008, it was in February. I refer you to the link of my posts of the time:
      https://petitesbullesdailleurs.fr/voyage-philippines-iles-visayas-2008/

      That said, it is quite possible to travel and dive in the Philippines at any time of the year & #8230; The archipelago is vast, I also imagine that it should not be the same weather everywhere at the same time. In short, I can only refer you to this page of the agency Evaneos, which summarizes at a glance what to expect, month by month, according to his centers of interest in the archipelago, from visiting the rice fields to scuba diving (but nothing on the underwater tour):
      https://www.evaneos.fr/philippines/voyage/quand-partir/

      Good preparations!

    1. @ Ludo / Luko: thank you very much & #8230; But because of you, photo questions, I will also have to discover and learn the joys of snootering one day next 😉
      In any case, yes, it is a real good plan in the area. And I admit, I love having "my" guide and "my" boat. #petitesbullesdeluxe
      Finally, we must recognize that there are excellent contributors, on Scubaboard & #8230; 😀

  6. Hello !

    As always, superb report and magnificent photos & #8230;

    I went to Cabilao 4/5 years ago and you make me want to go back during my next stay in March / April 2020!

    That's good, I have almost no more "new" places to discover in the Phils (good by searching well I still found some & #8230;)

    thanks again & #8230;

    1. @Chris Cool: thank you very much 🙂 Yes, Cabilao deserves that you return to see if it is still as good & #8230; But it's so big, the Philippines, that there are surely still lots of nice little places to dive and not too well known to discover. You will tell us soon 😉

  7. I'm refining my trip on Cabileo and Siguijor, just a quick question: Why did you choose Cabilao Sanctuary over Polaris, the price difference being huge, I'm wondering! Apparently the two resorts are facing the beach, so what sets them apart? I'm going to the diving show on January 12 in Paris, maybe I would find some details

    1. @Dominique Dujardin: n’ayant pas visité le Polaris, je ne saurais faire la comparaison… 😉 Comme je l’écris plus haut, les deux resorts sont côte à côte, leur situation géographique est donc identique. J’avais réservé le bungalow le moins cher au Sanctuary, qui restait abordable pour mon budget. Quant aux tarifs des plongées, ils sont similaires…

      As I explain in the article, it was the various reviews found on diving forums that made me opt for the Sanctuary, because as a photographer, the lowest price is not my main criterion for choose a resort, I am first interested in the service and the possibility of being able to take underwater photography in the best possible conditions & #8230; The Polaris certainly had good reviews too, but at the time when I was doing my research, it seemed to me less suitable for sub photography than the Sanctuary. Hence my choice.

      What convinced me, by reading the reviews, was the prospect of being in a more “family” resort (with a clientele that is not exclusively made up of divers), therefore much less crowded for diving trips and more flexibility. This effectively resulted in an almost "à la carte" service compared to my requests and the possibility of being really in a very small group underwater, as highlighted by some reports from other photographers divers. These are really criteria that count for me as a photographer & #8230;

      I admit that once there, I congratulated myself more than once on my choice, as I said above, seeing numerous flocks piling up on the boats of the neighboring resort, while he m sometimes happened to be alone with my guide on the boat & #8230; 😉

      But the best, indeed, will be to meet them at the Diving Fair and ask all the useful questions to make your choice, according to the criteria important to you 🙂

  8. Hello Corinne
    Again thank you for making me travel again, and the photos are superb as usual. We don't know Cabilao, but only Visayas and Anilao, so it will be a good idea for a next destination 🙂 !!
    I'm now waiting for your post on Raja Ampat in July! We were there almost at the same time & #8230; Good dives!

    1. @Pascal: thank you for your message, it's very nice to have taken the time to leave a note.

      Yes, Cabilao really deserves a few days of diving, I really enjoyed my short stay there. Of course, it is not as spectacular as Raja Ampat or Komodo in Indonesia, but the ratio "quality of the dives / ease of access / price" is excellent, a real good plan & #8230;

      As for Raja Ampat, I have already written so much on the subject, that there is less urgency to publish a new post. My article of "reference" which compiles full of info is there:
      https://petitesbullesdailleurs.fr/voyage-raja-ampat-infos-pratiques-20130303/
      And all my articles tagged "Raja Ampat" can be found at the end of this link:
      https://petitesbullesdailleurs.fr/raja-ampat/

      Good dives too! 🙂

  9. RE bonjour,
    Je reviens du salon de la plongée sans toutefois trouver plus d’explications J’ai réussi à réserver 0 Malapascua, le groc HIC c’est le transfert de Cebu à Cabilao. Soi disant les ferry banca ne font la navette que 2 fois par semaine, et le Sanctuaru ne répond pas à mes mails. Avez vous une idée comment s’organiser ? Notre avion est réservé ainsi que le 1er hotel à Malapascua. Cordialement

    1. @Dominic: rebonjour, désolée, mais je ne peux pas vraiment vous aider à organiser un transfert de Malapascua à Cabilao, je ne suis pas un agent de voyage 😉 et puis je vis à Rennes, en Bretagne, je ne connais donc pas par cœur les horaires des ferries philippins entre Malapascua, Cebu, Bohol, Cabilao…

      Pour le Sanctuary, vous devriez insister et leur renvoyer des e-mails, ils devraient bien finir par vous répondre (moi je ne les connais pas personnellement)… Sinon votre premier hôtel à Malapascua peut peut-être vous aider là-dessus ?

      Au pire, vous devriez bien réussir à vous renseigner une fois sur place, à Malapascua ou Cebu, sur les horaires des ferries et la meilleure solution pour vos transferts… Les hôtels sont assez bien au courant de ces trucs-là en général et peuvent organiser les transferts pour vous.

      Good preparations!

  10. @Dominique,
    je me permet d’intervenir car je suis ce topic.
    Je suis dans votre situation et le resort m’a répondu via Booking.
    Il faut prendre le ferry jusqu’à Tagbilaran et de là aller à Mocpoc par la route.
    La traversée vers le Sanctuary se fait en « public banca ». Je viens de demander s’il y a des horaires précis et aurai la réponse demain…
    cordially
    Alain

  11. @Dominique:réponse rapide de l’hôtel…bancas publiques de 6h à 18h qui vont directement de Mocpoc au resort. 800 Pesos par personne. L’hôtel a également une navette entre les deux ports, ce qui est intéressant si vous êtes plusieurs.
    Bon séjour.

    @Corinne: de rien, j’ai tellement utilisé votre blog pour mes voyages!

  12. Alain et Corinne, Merci beaucoup pour vos précisions qui me sont utiles. Je me mets en rapport avec mon hôtel Je pars le 1er Avril sur Malapascua et ensuite Cabilao. Cdt

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