Lovina Beach. Bali.

Lovina: black sand, meditation, water

  Indonesia: Bali - July 2008

Dear English-speaking readers, this page is an automatic translation made from a post originally written in French. My apologies for any strange sentences and funny mistakes that may have been generated during the process. If you are reading French, click on the French flag below to access the original and correct text: 


Lovina Beach... the name's nice, but I'm a little mixed up about the place. Here, the tourist pressure is certainly less than in Kuta-Legian-Seminyak. However, I have the impression to have been more solicited there than elsewhere by the tireless sellers of sarongs and other trinkets!

Lovina Beach: black sand beaches

Lovina Beach. Bali.

The solicitations of the sellers of trinkets are not very bad, that said. Once again, it is enough to get away from the heart of Lovina, namely the end of the beach and the two streets of restaurants and hotels spread around the dolphin monument (the village of Kalibukbuk), to be painstaking. In short, it is necessary to go squarely to the east or squarely to the west ...

Otherwise, the black sand beach is rather beautiful, and the colors of prahusthe traditional boats with rockers, aligned on the beach, are the most beautiful effect. The coast, protected by the reef, is much better for swimming than the dangerous rolls of Kuta.

Meditation at Brahma Vihara Arama Monastery

-Not being a follower of beaches pleasures, I went for a walk on my scooter, again.

This nice walk of a few kilometers led me to a curious Buddhist monastery, the Brahma Vihara AramaThe decor is a mix of Balinese monsters and "Buddhaseries" with a kitschy aesthetic...

It's actually a place of retirement, where people come to meditate.

Silence is de rigueur and we come across the "meditators", many Asians, some Westerners, walking with infinitely slow steps, around the pretty water lily pools and the various prayer buildings. Others are sitting, in suits, in small huts with transparent curtains, immersed in their silent meditations...

I was at the show... a soothing and amusing stopover!

Banjar, the sources of hot and soaked water

Just minutes away, there are air panas Banjar, hot springs. It is a popular place of relaxation.

We come as a family, wade in the basins of water. Color yellow-brown-green not very engaging, and it emanates a vague smell that reminds the chemistry classes ...

I did not really want to go for a dip, but the atmosphere is funny like anything.

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And on the way, we cross some nonchalant villages, where men chatter on the doorstep and greet the stranger who rides on a motorcycle, while women carry huge bundles of wood on their heads ...

Dolphin safaris

Finally, the big attraction of Lovina is the sea trips to see the dolphins at dawn. I've been hesitating since yesterday, but tonight I've made up my mind: I won't go to see the dolphins.

First of all, I've seen them before. But above all, going to chase these poor animals in motorboats does not mean anything to me... I shuddered at the comment of a young and nice couple who was with me on the bus and whom I met again tonight: "It was fun chasing them! » 

😱

Certainly, the dolphin safarisit turns the local economy and the cartel of boat captains fighting over this precious commodity that is the tourist. But I'm sure it is not at all beneficial to dolphins, this frenzy around them ... To avoid, therefore, because as far as I could judge, these outputs do not respect animals in any way ...

The backcountry villages and quieter places on the beach gave me a sense of what Lovina used to be like. A quiet place and surely more fun than it is today. There is a good choice of hotels and guesthouses, good restaurants, but I will not stay here forever. Lovina is singularly lacking in atmosphere.

Tomorrow, I'm going to take a look below the surface to see the state of the reef here, then I leave the day after tomorrow in Pemuteran, to dive around the island of Menjangan, at the end of the western peninsula of Bali.

  Indonesia: Bali - July 2008

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