Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.

Angkor and again

  Cambodia and Thailand - February 2011

Dear English-speaking readers, this page is an automatic Google translation from a post originally written in French. My apologies for the weird sentences and the funny mistakes that could have been generated during the process. If you can read French, click on the French flag below to access the original text:

Angkor WatIt is the best known temple, the largest, the most visited. It has even become a national symbol: its towers adorn the Cambodian flag. 

Optical illusion

But Angkor Wat is not my favorite temple. In fact, it is especially beautiful from a distance, in the perspective of the immense pavement of the entrance, where its five towers seem to form only three.

By the way, it's no coincidence that everyone makes their pictures in the same place. Just in front of a poor little pond, remains of the basins of yesteryear, located on the left side. By framing well, we have the illusion that the temple is reflected in a lake. Eh eh…

It is almost necessary to take a turn, on the edge of the pond, among all the other tourists, to make "the" photo.

I did like everyone else. A little disappointed, anyway, to have pretty green tarps (work in progress) in front.

General view of Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.
General view of Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.

In the heart of the city of Khmer kings

Angor Wat (The word "wat" or "vat" means "temple") is immense. It is the largest of the city of Angkor, former capital of Khmer kings of Cambodia.

Built in the 12th century, it was later converted into a Buddhist monastery. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The tourist affluence is at the height of its fame, necessarily. To enjoy it serenely, again, it is better to get up early and come at the first light of the day rather than at the end of the day, as we did.

But the light is beautiful, late afternoon. And there are a lot of funny scenes to watch on the main roadway of the entrance.

Photo souvenir at the entrance of Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.
Photo souvenir at the entrance of Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.
Beware of the heat of the sun! Angkor Wat, Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.
Beware of the heat of the sun! Angkor Wat, Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.

Inside, one appreciates the half-light and the refreshing breath of the air which sneaks by the pillars of the windows.

At the endless mythological fresco that goes around the gallery like a stone comic, I prefer the elegant sculptures of the apsaras, the celestial dancers, with their hairstyles worthy of modern mangas and their bewitching smiles.

Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.

Apsaras (celestial dancers) in Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.

Apsara (celestial dancer) in Angkor Wat. Siem Reap, Cambodia, February 2011.

I'm glad I saw Angkor Wat again. But then again, I shuddered while discovering a tourist crowd much denser than I imagined ... I prepare you a small special series on the subject!

 ;-)

  Cambodia and Thailand - February 2011

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Ah, green tarpaulins ... you can not imagine how disgusted I was when I discovered them ...

    On va dire que cela me fera un prétexte pour y retourner 🙂

  2. Bravo pour cette série de photos. 🙂 Ma préférée, la statue de Buddha et son dais jaune; est-ce le mot adéquat chez les bouddhistes? Aurais bien aimé aussi la voir de face !
    Et puis zut aux touristes ! Tu en fais partie toi aussi, alors… le site est tellement splendide, tant de beautés à voir! 😉

  3. @Will: Je n’aime pas trop retoucher mes photos, en général, j’évite de « tricher » avec la réalité… Je me contente de recadrer, de travailler un peu les contrastes, la lumière, mais c’est tout. Les bâches vertes resteront là… 😉

    @Ysbilia: You will also see her face, the statue, when I'm back, I have other pictures ...
    Quant aux touristes, hum, j’en fais certes partie, mais quand ils débarquent ensemble, à plusieurs dizaines de groupes, le plus souvent nippons, sur le même site, ça fait peur. J’ai une jolie série d’images sur le sujet… 🙄

    @Fabrice: Oui, vu que je viens d’y passer quelques jours… Tiens-toi prêt, d’autres billets sur les vieilles pierres khmères arrivent bientôt !!! 😀

23 Shares
Share20
Tweet3
Pine
Share