Latest bubbles in Mabul and Sipadan

Dear English-speaking readers, this page is an automatic Google translation from a post originally written in French. My apologies for the weird sentences and the funny mistakes that could have been generated during the process. If you can read French, the original and correct version can be found here:

  Borneo [Malaysia and Indonesia] - July 2009

I dropped my last bubbles in Sipadan on Monday. Ultimate and intense underwater emotions in the midst of sharks, turtles and barracuda ...

The abundant reef that protects the island is actually a vertiginous cliff underwater. Which goes down more than 600 meters! Fortunately for us, scuba divers or snorkelers, the show is close to the surface.

If the "big" ensures the show, small creatures are not left behind. For the pleasure of the eyes, here are some of the more modest wonders that one encounters underwater in Mabul and Sipadan.

Of course, I also let go of the nudis ... I do not get tired of these small colorful sea slugs. In Mabul as in Sipadan, it is a festival.

I'll give you the pictures in a future post, "special nudibranchs"!

 ;-)

  Borneo [Malaysia and Indonesia] - July 2009

  1. I love your pictures of little "things" ... With this series, two of my favorites, the little plaid (long nose hawfish ???) and the charming blenny ...

  2. Veinarde !!! ... I just returned from a very pleasant trip to the US (New York + Niagara), and I dream to go back to diving. I'm planning a departure for soon, but in the meantime your stories make me feel good!

    I particularly like your crocodile fish. Tell me, you still have not changed your camera?

    Good luck and enjoy! ...

    8)

  3. @Malene: We have the same "darlings" !!! The little red checker, I just remember it's called "long nose something" in English. I will take the time to find his real name in French when I return.
    😉

    @Yann: Thanks Yann !!! But we must not rely on the azure transparency of the waves on the beach. Once under the surface, there may be places where the visibility is very bad, because of the particles in suspension, especially when it rained the day before. In Mabul, in particular, where we practice the "muck-dive" (literally "slush-diving"), we often move in a kind of underwater fog ... it forces us to focus on small animals hidden in the sand or on the reef. And we discover treasures for the macro photo!
    🙂

    @ Marie-Julie: it does not surprise me ... Hey! Hey!
    😀

    @A World Elsewhere: Hello Marie-Angel, I discovered your beautiful photo of Niagara Falls last night. I was tired, and I have not yet taken the time to read in detail the story of your stay there, but as I am stuck today in Tawau, I will finally be able to catch up in reading my favorite blogs!
    I like it too, this crocodile-fish, and your compliment, from a wise photographer, touches me a lot. Especially since no, I still have not changed the camera (still the old Canon Powershot A95 with its small built-in flash). But I intend to put pennies in the coming months to offer me a box worthy of the name, with its box, which will accompany me, I hope, during my next ploufs ...
    🙄

  4. Your photos have gained in quality over the dives, so it is time indeed to think of more "serious" material to allow you to do even better. But as we say: "step by step" ...

    I have a terrible delay in publishing my travel stories, I have left too often since the beginning of the year (I'm going to be lynched if I say that?) And I'm doing my best to free myself the end July and the whole month of August to finally get back to writing! On the other hand, we can not write if we do not travel more ... Let's say that I have accumulated matter (and destinations!) For 6 months but I would like to take the time to tell all that.

    Today, I'm talking about July 14 in Paris, and I'm already writing the next article. Why can not we have 6 hands?! ...
    🙄

  5. Well, the last time I saw such dense schools of fish was in DAKAR? so much fish that the wreck was invisible ...
    and for the macro and the nudis, I see you make the suspense last 😥
    go to the end of our torture 🙁 and give us your photos 😉

  6. 😀 Like what you can do great pictures without a big cumbersome device and powerful external flash ... the eye of the photographer and his ability to use a camera make a big difference. Just look, contemplate, see the beauty of life underwater and want to restore its beauty ... and know how to approach gently ... you're very talented, bravo!
    I love your pictures! They show a moment of life and we believe it!

    FYI, the small red check is a longnose hawkfish, or oxycirrhites typus, or fish falcon long nose, bravo Malene!

  7. @A World Elsewhere: Thank you Marie-Ange! I feel like I'm progressing, little by little ... But I'm starting to have a look at the possibilities of this little camera. It's going to be time for me to move on to the next stage and equip myself for good, that's for sure. In any case, I have an infinite pleasure to make the picture under water, and this pleasure can only be increased tenfold with a real case!
    Finally, to tell all your journeys for 6 months, you would not only need six hands, but also days of 48 hours, right?
    😉

    @Laurence: During my last dives in Sipadan, I swam in the middle of the barracudas bench ... Really impressive. Otherwise, for the nudists, I put an end to the ordeal! They are online.
    🙄

    @Manta: Merkiii !!!!!
    It is especially by dint of doing and remaking, underwater flashings that I learned to better control my camera, and the technical constraints of the photo sub. That said, I'm starting to feel "limited" on this little camera. If there is a way to get things pretty suitable macro, ambient photos are far from what I would like ... But it will come! I can not wait to have a big cumbersome device with external flashes !!! I may well have fun with a toy like this ...
    😀

  8. @ VoyageurAsie / Obeo: Thank you for the link. I wonder who, the dog or the dolphin was the most difficult to train for this "kiss" maritime.
    😉

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